Pivotal Moment in AI Governance from EU: Coming to a theatre near you?

In a groundbreaking move, the European Parliament last week officially adopted the Artificial Intelligence Act, marking a significant milestone in the global regulation of AI technology. This landmark law, receiving a strong endorsement with 523 votes in favor, aims to safeguard fundamental rights and foster innovation, positioning Europe as a global leader in the ethical development of AI. The Act introduces stringent measures against high-risk AI applications that could threaten citizens’ rights, such as unregulated facial recognition and social scoring, while setting clear obligations for AI systems based on their potential risks and impacts.

For enthusiasts and professionals in the AI field, this development is crucial as it outlines the future landscape of AI development and deployment within Europe. It not only bans certain AI practices but also establishes a framework for promoting safe, transparent, and accountable AI technologies. This regulatory approach could serve as a blueprint for other regions, emphasizing the importance of aligning AI advancements with democratic values, human rights, and environmental sustainability.

This pivotal moment in AI governance underscores the EU’s commitment to ensuring that AI serves the public good while mitigating risks associated with its deployment. As the AI Act moves towards final adoption and implementation, it represents a significant step forward in the responsible and ethical use of artificial intelligence technologies worldwide.

Artificial Intelligence Act: MEPs adopt landmark law

So does this apply to everyone or just some? :eyes:
coughPRISMcough

We can’t possibly continue politics like we have before, we need transparency. Otherwise it’s just pretentious little deals to “play” justice by selectively excluding parties from the game.

While I do value security, I do not believe in the EU. It’s gone down south in recent years, as far as I can tell. As someone from Switzerland, I have made some … unsettling experiences. The EU keeps threatening us with exclusion to blackmail us into joining their club, so they can have a grab at our pockets.

I’m sceptical, to say the least. This decision might very well hurt us in the long run, slowing down development and setting us back even further. We’re already fully depending on the states when it comes to hard- and software.

But!
I would love to be wrong, please surprise me, EU, please do! I’m all for it!

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EU has form when it comes to stamping on innovation that doesn’t fit their agenda of control

Matz - You covered a lot of ground… here’s my take:

  1. So does this apply to everyone or just some?

It’s an EU law so ostensibly applicable to EU citizens and entities. However, as you allude to, the EU routinely tries, and often succeeds, in cramming down their laws on US citizens via multinational corporations ; e.g. GDPR became a defacto standard within US companies with EU operations. You gotta give the MEPs credit for understanding “first mover advantage” in politics. Look at where we are - The US VeeP holds our AI policy portfolio… fortunately, the NIST AI Safety Institute will hold it for her so she won’t hurt herself. My guess the EU act fills the void.

  1. We can’t possibly continue politics like we have before, we need transparency. Otherwise it’s just pretentious little deals to “play” justice by selectively excluding parties from the game. —
    IMO the politics will continue and governments will do their best to use AI to maintain political advantage. Necessarily this means cutting deals and choosing winners / losers. That said, the release of GRONC could represent an interesting turning point in these dynamics.

  2. While I do value security, I do not believe in the EU. It’s gone down south in recent years, as far as I can tell. As someone from Switzerland, I have made some … unsettling experiences.

You undoubtedly understand the EU’s failure to create leadership in most digital domains results in power plays implemented through complex regulatory hurdles to snare US / multinationals companies and subjugate them… as you mention below.

The EU keeps threatening us with exclusion to blackmail us into joining their club, so they can have a grab at our pockets.

  1. I’m sceptical, to say the least. This decision might very well hurt us in the long run, slowing down development and setting us back even further. We’re already fully depending on the states when it comes to hard- and software.

Likely your right and development will be impeded. However, the EU was already an unlikely source of future AI leadership. Time will tell. What’s very cool (and simultaneously worrisome) about AI tech is that no country necessarily has a monopoly on reaping its benefits. However, massive investment will sway the landscape. Just look at Altman’s conversations with the Saudis!

  1. But!
    I would love to be wrong, please surprise me, EU, please do! I’m all for it!

One positive outcome from the EU - both GDPR and the AI Act place strong protections on individual privacy rights and freedoms. IMO we’ve lost our way on these matters with both corporations and the USG playing fast and loose with little public pushback and much complacency from the media.

If AI safety, trustworthiness and explainability are treated seriously there’s a path to enjoying AI without compromising privacy and freedoms.

For now - I’d stay skeptical…I am as well!

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Bingo!